Waterfowl Tracker Map – Drake Waterfowl

Drake Waterfowl has partnered with Louisiana Wildlife & Fisheries Foundation to collect quantifiable data of the 2019 waterfowl migration. Multiple birds have been captured and outfitted with transmitters, allowing their journey south to be followed by you and I, and answering with certainty that age-old question - WHERE ARE THE DUCKS?

Drake Waterfowl has partnered with Louisiana Wildlife & Fisheries Foundation to collect quantifiable data of the 2019 waterfowl migration. Multiple birds have been captured and outfitted with transmitters, allowing their journey south to be followed by you and I, and answering with certainty that age-old question - WHERE ARE THE DUCKS?

  • OCTOBER 10
  • OCTOBER 14
  • OCTOBER 30
  • NOVEMBER 7
  • OCT 10
  • OCT 14
  • OCT 30
  • NOV 7

Be sure to check back periodically for updated movements as birds begin making their way down.
More information on the species tracked and the telemetry projects conducted can be found below the map.

PLEASE NOTE:

Transmitted locations* are accurate on the dates displayed only, and serve as a general reference to overall bird movement across the North American continent. Large groups of birds may move frequently or remain stationary for extended periods of time.

Survival of these birds is not guaranteed, and numerous factors, including predators and proximity to cell towers, may prevent a signal from being acquired.

Pinch and Zoom for optimal performance on mobile

Be sure to check back periodically for updated movements as birds begin making their way down.
More information on the species tracked and the telemetry projects conducted can be found below the map.

PLEASE NOTE:

Transmitted locations* are accurate on the dates displayed only, and serve as a general reference to overall bird movement across the North American continent. Birds may move frequently or remain stationary for extended periods of time.

Survival of these birds is not guaranteed, and numerous factors, including predators and proximity to cell towers, may prevent a signal from being acquired.

*Locations and data provided by Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation

*Locations and data provided by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries

WATERFOWL SPECIES TRACKED

MALLARD

Mallards have one of the most extensive breeding ranges of any duck in North America, extending across the northern third of the United States and up to the Bering Sea. The highest mallard densities occur in the Prairie Pothole Region of Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba and North and South Dakota, with nests placed in upland habitat near wetlands on the ground. Female mallards lay an average of 9 eggs.

BLUE-WINGED TEAL

Blue-winged teal breed primarily in the northern prairies and parklands of central North America. Their relative abundance generally increases from west to east, and north to south within the Prairie Pothole Region. Nesting habitat includes wetland areas within grasslands, such as shallow marshes, sloughs, flooded ditches, and temporary ponds. Females change breeding sites from year to year in response to changing wetland conditions and lay an average of 10 eggs.

WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

White-fronted geese are circumpolar in their breeding distribution. The majority of white-fronted geese in North America breed near the Arctic Circle from Alaska to central Canada. They are solitary breeders and nest on both tidal flats and upland areas, most frequently among tall grass and sedges bordering sloughs and marshes. Female white-fronted geese lay an average of 5 eggs.

MALLARD

Mallards have one of the most extensive breeding ranges of any duck in North America, extending across the northern third of the United States and up to the Bering Sea. The highest mallard densities occur in the Prairie Pothole Region of Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba and North and South Dakota, with nests placed in upland habitat near wetlands on the ground. Female mallards lay an average of 9 eggs.

BLUE-WINGED TEAL

Blue-winged teal breed primarily in the northern prairies and parklands of central North America. Their relative abundance generally increases from west to east, and north to south within the Prairie Pothole Region. Nesting habitat includes wetland areas within grasslands, such as shallow marshes, sloughs, flooded ditches, and temporary ponds. Females change breeding sites from year to year in response to changing wetland conditions and lay an average of 10 eggs.

WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

White-fronted geese are circumpolar in their breeding distribution. The majority of white-fronted geese in North America breed near the Arctic Circle from Alaska to central Canada. They are solitary breeders and nest on both tidal flats and upland areas, most frequently among tall grass and sedges bordering sloughs and marshes. Female white-fronted geese lay an average of 5 eggs.

WATERFOWL SPECIES TRACKED

MALLARD

Mallards have one of the most extensive breeding ranges of any duck in North America, extending across the northern third of the United States and up to the Bering Sea. The highest mallard densities occur in the Prairie Pothole Region of Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba and North and South Dakota, with nests placed in upland habitat near wetlands on the ground. Female mallards lay an average of 9 eggs.

BLUE-WINGED TEAL

Blue-winged teal breed primarily in the northern prairies and parklands of central North America. Their relative abundance generally increases from west to east, and north to south within the Prairie Pothole Region. Nesting habitat includes wetland areas within grasslands, such as shallow marshes, sloughs, flooded ditches, and temporary ponds. Females change breeding sites from year to year in response to changing wetland conditions and lay an average of 10 eggs.

WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

White-fronted geese are circumpolar in their breeding distribution. The majority of white-fronted geese in North America breed near the Arctic Circle from Alaska to central Canada. They are solitary breeders and nest on both tidal flats and upland areas, most frequently among tall grass and sedges bordering sloughs and marshes. Female white-fronted geese lay an average of 5 eggs.

MALLARD

Mallards have one of the most extensive breeding ranges of any duck in North America, extending across the northern third of the United States and up to the Bering Sea. The highest mallard densities occur in the Prairie Pothole Region of Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba and North and South Dakota, with nests placed in upland habitat near wetlands on the ground. Female mallards lay an average of 9 eggs.

BLUE-WINGED TEAL

Blue-winged teal breed primarily in the northern prairies and parklands of central North America. Their relative abundance generally increases from west to east, and north to south within the Prairie Pothole Region. Nesting habitat includes wetland areas within grasslands, such as shallow marshes, sloughs, flooded ditches, and temporary ponds. Females change breeding sites from year to year in response to changing wetland conditions and lay an average of 10 eggs.

WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

White-fronted geese are circumpolar in their breeding distribution. The majority of white-fronted geese in North America breed near the Arctic Circle from Alaska to central Canada. They are solitary breeders and nest on both tidal flats and upland areas, most frequently among tall grass and sedges bordering sloughs and marshes. Female white-fronted geese lay an average of 5 eggs.

WATERFOWL TELEMETRY PROJECTS

The Louisiana Wildlife & Fisheries Foundation is conducting 3 extensive telemetry projects in hopes of identifying migration routes,
timing of migrations, and important breeding, staging, and wintering areas for mallards, blue-winged teal, and greater white-fronted geese.
With your help, we hope to further educate hunters and fund research efforts to better understand waterfowl habits and impact on conservation.

The Louisiana Wildlife & Fisheries Foundation is conducting 3 extensive telemetry projects in hopes of identifying migration routes,
timing of migrations, and important breeding, staging, and wintering areas for mallards, blue-winged teal, and greater white-fronted geese.
With your help, we hope to further educate hunters and fund research efforts to better understand waterfowl habits and impact on conservation.

MALLARD

BLUE-WINGED TEAL

WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

MALLARD

BLUE-WINGED TEAL

WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

MALLARD

Mallards have one of the most extensive breeding ranges of any duck in North America, extending across the northern third of the United States and up to the Bering Sea. The highest mallard densities occur in the Prairie Pothole Region of Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba and North and South Dakota, with nests placed in upland habitat near wetlands on the ground. Female mallards lay an average of 9 eggs.

BLUE-WINGED TEAL

Blue-winged teal breed primarily in the northern prairies and parklands of central North America. Their relative abundance generally increases from west to east, and north to south within the Prairie Pothole Region. Nesting habitat includes wetland areas within grasslands, such as shallow marshes, sloughs, flooded ditches, and temporary ponds. Females change breeding sites from year to year in response to changing wetland conditions and lay an average of 10 eggs.

WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

White-fronted geese are circumpolar in their breeding distribution. The majority of white-fronted geese in North America breed near the Arctic Circle from Alaska to central Canada. They are solitary breeders and nest on both tidal flats and upland areas, most frequently among tall grass and sedges bordering sloughs and marshes. Female white-fronted geese lay an average of 5 eggs.

WATERFOWL TELEMETRY PROJECTS

The Louisiana Wildlife & Fisheries Foundation is conducting 3 extensive telemetry projects in hopes of identifying migration routes,
timing of migrations, and important breeding, staging, and wintering areas for mallards, blue-winged teal, and greater white-fronted geese.
With your help, we hope to further educate hunters and fund research efforts to better understand waterfowl habits and impact on conservation.

MALLARD

BLUE-WINGED TEAL

WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

The Louisiana Wildlife & Fisheries Foundation is conducting 3 extensive telemetry projects in hopes of identifying migration routes, timing of migrations, and important breeding, staging, and wintering areas for mallards, blue-winged teal, and greater white-fronted geese.

With your help, we hope to further educate hunters and fund research efforts to better understand waterfowl habits and impact on conservation.

MALLARD

BLUE-WINGED TEAL

WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE